First Round of IV Vitamins, and the Unemployment/Disability Situation

Yesterday, on the 23rd, I got my first infusion of fluids vitamins, and amino acids. It wasn’t pleasant, but mostly because I was still so sick going into the appointment. Basically I’m still having bleeding issues, most likely from my colon, and lower intestines. I’m also having a lot of nausea courtesy of the gastroparesis. I find myself in this horrible situation where, if my stomach and upper intestines empty, they hit the lower intestines where the ulcerations are. So the nausea fades momentarily, only to return as the pain of the food and drink moving through me hits the ulcers. The doctors are fairly sure some of the ulcers were deep, and created blood clot like scabs that are coming off when I feel like I have to go to the bathroom. It’s super fun…

Anyhow, I pulled myself up off the bathroom floor (literally) and went in for the infusion. I was pleasantly surprised when the nurse hit a vein on the first try. (I had forced myself to drink and keep down liquids, though it had left me violently nauseated.) She warned me that the infusion would taste funny, like a Flintstone vitamin. Turns out it tasted exactly like one, but not the fun fruity part…the gross after taste part. This would have been manageable had I brought mints or something, but I hadn’t. It also would have been manageable if I weren’t already trying to avoid throwing up. Then there was the woman who seemed determined to talk to me.

I am pale, obviously in pain, and she just kept talking…

I’m not sure what we talked about. I grunted responses periodically, but spent most of the time checking out her adorable dog. Then something fun happened. About halfway through the bag I thought I was dying. I felt hot flashes, the nausea peaked, and I was pretty convinced I was going to faint or have a seizure. Then, a little while later, it all went away. I told myself it was just the Zofran I had taken prior to the infusion…but I kept feeling less horrendous. Now, don’t get me wrong, the damn thing still tasted awful, but I didn’t feel as awful. 3/4 of the way through the infusion, I was actually sitting up in the chair instead of half curled over. As it finished I had to admit, I felt a lot better, just from the fluids. The vitamins were much needed, but I am sure they haven’t done much just yet. The nurses and nutritionist had all said it would take several regular infusions before I felt a lasting benefit from the vitamins and amino acids. As I’m getting up to leave, talkative lady addresses me and the nurse.

“You look less dead.” Then to the nurse, “Doesn’t she look a lot less dead?”

I mean I’d rather look totally alive, but I’ll take less dead I suppose. My stomach still hasn’t been doing well, but that’s just the nature of the situation. My upper GI doesn’t want to move at all, while the lower GI is a mess of ulcerations and blood. Happy holidays I suppose.

Hopefully I can get an update on my wheelchair after the holiday. I’m bummed that I’ll have to start paying copayments and whatnot, given my insurance year will begin again, but I’m hoping I won’t have to pay it all at once with the wheelchair. That would definitely require me to sell everything I own. I’m also excited to start IVIG. I’m crossing my fingers for some good news regarding my disability as well.

For a long time I was opposed to the idea of disability. I want to work. Not working leaves me unfulfilled. It isn’t even about finances, though I’m definitely struggling financially. Working has always given me a sense of pride and purpose. Even the smallest job made me feel like I was contributing in some way. Without working I feel sort of useless. I know I couldn’t work the way things are right now. As much as I may want to work, I just don’t know day to day how I’ll feel. Plus there are the medical treatments. We’re talking about IV infusions 2x per week, if insurance will cover it, then IVIG which will be given over a period of two days. From what I’ve read IVIG is done every 4-6 weeks. If it lines up with IV nutrition appointments, I could be spending 4 out of 5 days in medical offices one week per month. I’d still be spending two days per week in medical offices anyhow. Once we’re able, we’ll wean me to an IV per week, but ultimately we can’t go lower than that since I really need the fluids.

This is the thing people don’t seem to grasp about disability, and those of us who are chronically ill. We fight hard to get to a baseline that is somewhat close to that of a healthy person. Most of us won’t ever feel as healthy as a healthy person, but we can fight hard to become functional enough to basically pass as healthy. Getting to that point takes a lot of effort and time though. In my instance we’re talking several IV treatments, a ton of oral medications, and carefully orchestrated drinks and snacks. Even with all of that, I could wake up and feel miserable. If you look at my IV schedule alone, it become a scheduling nightmare. Toss in the fact my body doesn’t operate well in the mornings, and that I could randomly have a few bad days without warning, and you get someone who really doesn’t have the ability to work right now.

I am not defined by my illness, however, I am limited by it. For a long time I lied to myself, and swore that Behcet’s and the things it has caused like gastroparesis and autonomic neuropathy, would never limit me. I was determined to live the life I wanted, despite the symptoms. As I pushed myself, I got sicker and sicker. Then denial kicked in. I told myself that I was in a flare, and that once the flare was over, I could get back to living a normal life. Denial isn’t helpful. I hit a point where I had to acknowledge that some of the things I wanted to do, I couldn’t do, because of my chronic illnesses, and that’s okay.

Yes, you read that right folks, it’s okay to accept that your disease limits you…as long as you don’t let it define the entirety of your being.

I am chronically ill. I may have to use my wheelchair at times. I cannot work. My diet is an absolute wreck, and even when I do follow the doctor’s advice, I can’t always succeed. The ER team knows me. Professors have to allow me extra time should I require it. These are all facts of life for me. I accept it, and I pivot because of it.

Find something else that you love, and know that limitations are not forever, but even the ones that do stick around don’t change who you are as a person. 

Life is what it is, and sometimes we can’t wrap our heads around having to change our plans, but we also can find ourselves trying something new that we hadn’t even thought of before. We find new passions, new paths, and we go with it.

So go with it. 

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First Round of IV Vitamins, and the Unemployment/Disability Situation