When You Just Can’t


Today I’m somehow depressed, but more positive. I don’t know if that makes any sense. The best way I can describe it is chemical versus rational. Chemically I’m out of whack, but that makes sense. I haven’t been taking in a ton of calories, which led to me almost getting a period. Let me explain…

Your average female who menstruates, thinks that underrating results in losing your period…and it does. There is also a reverse mechanism though. TMI alert…I have an IUD. When I first got it I was not pleased, I basically spotted for a month, had terrible cramps, and wanted to punch my gynecologist in the face. (For starters, he gave me a generic version of Mirena only approved for 3 years, not 5, but told me he was putting in Mirena. It was super fun finding out that I got something else after it had been inserted. (Bonus points for the fact that he had opened my cervix, realized he forgot something, and had to open my cervix a second time. Don’t worry, he’s not my doctor anymore.) After a month though, my periods stopped.

This was 2.5 years ago. Since then I haven’t really had a period, which given my brutal periods, was a good thing. When I started getting really sick, right before starting Cytoxan, I hemorrhaged. I brushed it off as a really bad sudden period, but when it happened a few more times, I went into my gynecologist. At this point in time I was around 120 pounds, and I’m 5’10”. I went in, and the first thing my gynecologist told me was that I had lost weight and I looked good.

I was so malnourished at this point, my hair was falling out, I was growing white fuzz on my body, and I was literally incapable of warming my feet and hands. I looked like I was dying, and I felt like I was dying, and yet this doctor had the nerve to say I looked good. What the…

As we have established, he’s not my doctor anymore. What he told me made sense though. I can’t have estrogen containing birth control because of a family history of blood clots. With my one artery being potential impacted by Behcet’s, there was also an increased worry over whether or not I was personally at additional risk from the Behcet’s. I was informed that my body was suddenly producing extra estrogen in an attempt to instigate hunger, because I wasn’t taking in enough calories. These bursts of estrogen were causing intense bleeding. Fair enough, but still aggravating. Plus…if I looked so great, why was my body willing to risk bleeding like that in order to cause hunger pangs?

I really should have reported him. We all have different preferences and visions of beauty, but as a medical professional your focus should be making sure your patient is healthy. I had lost a significant amount of weight, and was no longer at a safe weight for my height. Perhaps my slender frame was normal in his life, but it was something that warranted investigation as my physician. 

I’m lucky right now. My doctors noted the 30 pounds I lost, because while it was fine to lose it, and while I’m still in a healthy weight range, and could even lose more weight, the quickness with which that weight came off was NOT healthy. 30 pounds in 30 days is not a goal.

So tomorrow my wheelchair comes. Today I did nothing. Every time I stood up, I got shooting pains in my head, neck, and lower back. They have never found the source, and have suggested dehydration each and every time. Given that I haven’t gotten my infusions in a while, that’s 110% true. I am dehydrated. Still, these headaches and related back pains, just murder me in terms of movement. I’ve also just been weak. As embarrassed as I am by the thought of the chair, I know that I’ll be able to go get things for myself again, decreasing days like this were I’m struggling. (I can’t afford delivery of groceries right now, and I can’t tolerate water no matter how hard I try.) I wanted to go see people today, but I was stuck inside. I struggled to even take my dog out. Thankfully my roommate took him out just now so I don’t have to attempt to navigate the streets tonight.

Chronic illness is a lot of fighting, but it’s a lot of acceptance, too. When I started the signs of bleeding today, I faced the fact that, even though I wanted fries, one sleeve of fries and two pieces of toast in an entire day, is just not enough to live on. I forced myself to eat maple syrup today even though I desperately didn’t want it, because I knew it was calorie dense, and liquid. I put it on toast as a sort of pseudo french toast.

Again, it wasn’t good, and I don’t recommend it as a fun treat. It did what it needed to do, and that was the point. Gastroparesis changes how you see food. It’s fuel, but it’s also something you kind of chase impulsively. If I know something won’t make me vomit, or writhe around in horrid pain, I’m going to eat it. 

My failure to get out and do anything today, the pain, the fatigue, the anxiety over the chair, I logically worked through each thing…but my brain chemistry felt like it still need to give me a little shove via depression. I have depression and anxiety because of my PTSD, but I suffer because of the major depression from my Keppra. How do I know? The symptoms are so different. With things relating to my PTSD, talk therapy, thinking through the situation, finding routines, they all help with the symptoms. Plus the symptoms are less life limiting. Sure, I’m startled easily, hyper vigilant, and can’t handle some situations, but I’ve come a long way via cognitive behavioral therapy, and conventional talk therapy.

Major depressive disorder doesn’t care how much you talk…

Trigger Warning: Below there is talk of self harm and suicide. If you are triggered by discussion of this subject please discontinue reading this blog. If you or someone you know is thinking of suicide, please call, text or message, the suicide hotline (in the United States. I apologize as I don’t have information in other countries. I do believe 999 is emergency services in the UK, and 000 is Australia.)

Suicide Hotline: Call 1-800-273-8255, Available 24 hours everyday, there website is https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org



One thing my major depressive disorder causes, that my PTSD and related anxiety/depression never caused, is really obsessive suicidal and self-harm thoughts. I have had thoughts of both in the past as a result of my PTSD, and medication decreased those thoughts, but they were never as intense as they are with the major depressive disorder. I will become immobile, just stuck in bed. Then I’ll drag myself to the shower, and just climb in wearing my clothes. I would look around and just see items I could hurt myself with, or even kill myself with. Living 24 floors up when your meds aren’t sorted out, is a real test of self-control. Thankfully I talked with my doctors, and we began a treatment plan.

Today was just one of those weird days where the meds worked, but not well enough. I felt worthless all day. Financial struggles caused me anxiety, but the inability to socialize was the worst. I’m generally okay with being introverted, but when my medical issues make it impossible for me to go out, it creates a small crack for the botched chemistry to spill out of. There is something so bizarre about feeling utterly worthless, feeling like you should just run into the woods and never talk to anyone again, but also recognizing the irrationality of that thought process.

Thank you biochemistry for the gloriously f*cked up mess, that is my brain on Keppra.

To be totally fair it wasn’t normal before the anticonvulsant came into my life, but it was manageable without medication. I am not embarrassed that I need medication to keep myself safe. There was a time when I was ashamed of my thoughts. I didn’t want anyone knowing how violent and real they were. Now I realize the importance of recognizing the severity of that thought process, and the need to ask for help.

Chronic illness warriors, spoonies, sick people, whatever label those of us choose to use, tend not to be folks who really love asking for help. We’ve been in the hospital. We’ve had to call nurses every single time we had to go to the bathroom. We’ve eaten bad hospital food. We’ve gone through painful procedures.

We are conditioned to prove our independence…so if we ask for help, we probably need it badly.

That was today. I don’t feel well, but I’m also oddly at peace with it in a rational sense. I can tell you why my stomach is messed up. I can tell you why my asthma is flaring. I can’t tell you what this headache combination is, but I can tell you that it’s probably related to the fact I haven’t had enough to drink today. Now I’m going to take a nice bath since last night’s bath was ruined by a lack of hot water.

If you are reading this, and you’re realizing that you have a logical side of your brain that shouts over that illogical biochemistry induced portion, I’m sending you a gentle hug via our phone/tablet/computer/whatever. You’re not alone. Focus on that little rational voice shooting from the back, it’ll guide you on the right path. 

When You Just Can’t

Flare City – Autoimmune Blister and Staph Infection

It’s no secret that I’ve been stuck in a pretty constant flare that only seems to be getting worse. The only option I have is to wait for my insurance to approve IVIG. We’ve done one steroid dose pack and I’m preparing for a second. To make things even more fun, my rheumatologist is out on maternity leave, and my insurance company was taken over by another company (it’s a contract deal). The transition hasn’t been smooth, to the point where I can’t even call and get a hold of someone at my insurance company…and I’ve even trying for six weeks.

Yes folks, you read that properly, I haven’t been able to speak to a human being at my insurance company for over six weeks.

While this may annoy the average 31-year-old insured individual, it’s definitely not the best when you’re in the middle of complex insurance approval processes. My chair is coming on Monday (if I can work out a payment plan), but IVIG still remains in limbo. My rheumatologist’s replacement suggested I switch to another practice, something that was discussed a year ago but discarded as I prefer my rheumatologist, and the university hospital nearby has a horrid chief of rheumatology (or at least did a year ago). Point is, I like my rheumatologist, she just happened to have a baby the same time period where my insurance company went to shit.

I was dealing with the increased gastroparesis symptoms, the GI bleeding, the fatigue, all of it…and then something new for me happened. I woke up last weekend, with a blister on my hand. It was just a little thing, but over the course of the day it got worse and worse. There was speculation on my part, and my friends’ parts, over what caused this blister. The best we could come up with is that my hot water bottle somehow burned me, but I didn’t wake up, and the bottle doesn’t have a leak. Moreover, I haven’t ever had an issue with it. So this blister just keeps getting worse, and eventually it takes over my entire knuckle and is working down into my hand.

I’m being eaten by a blister of unknown origin.

My friend Mike is a chef, and he informs me that I need to ignore everyone else’s advice and just pop it, throw some antibacterial ointment on it, and go about my life. I call him stupid until the thing begins to get so big I don’t have much of a choice. I was not having that thing pop in my sleep, and realistically I’m too clumsy not to bump it on something and randomly (and disgustingly) pop it unexpectedly.


I pop it, and it’s not really anything special. I throw some bacitracin on it, and call it a day. The next day it’s tender, but not abnormal, and I keep it open so it can heal, but I’m careful to keep it clean, or so I thought. The next few days are a blur because I wasn’t feeling well in general, and I had an allergist appointment. What I do remember is looking at the spot where the blister had been, and being in denial that it was infected…until the day I went to the allergist, when I realized it was scabbing over pus filled portions, and literally creating an abscess.

Double gross.

I went from my allergist to my primary care doctor, who promptly told me I was correct, and it was definitely infected. He also informed me that autoimmune blistering is an actual thing. My body literally attacked the layers of my skin, creating a blister because it just destroyed a section on my hand. He gave me a prescription for antibiotics, but by the next day it was worse. Way worse. The night I’d gotten antibiotics it had worsened to the point where I had a thin layer of skin covering what was undoubtedly my tendon.

You shouldn’t be able to watch your tendons move, and while it was disturbing, I will admit it was kind of cool. Still, I don’t recommend it.

My doctor calls after I take another dose of the antibiotics that were already making me feel like total hell. Apparently I have a multi-drug resistant staph-infection, and while it isn’t MRSA, it doesn’t matter, because I’m allergic to all drugs ending in -cillin. Yay. We’ve established it’s getting rapidly worse, because I’m taking a boatload of immune suppressing drugs, even though they’re not doing a great job at treating my Behcet’s anyhow. Fantastic universe. So I’m sent to the ER.

The ER wasn’t too busy because of the time of day I went in. They ended up wanting an MRI because there was a chance my joint and tendon were infected, but thankfully they weren’t. That would have meant being admitted and going on IV drugs for a few days. I was given an IV push of an antibiotic (but honestly can’t remember the name), and send home on Keflex. I hate Keflex because of the nausea it  causes, but I don’t have much of a choice because of my allergies. Another issue I have with Keflex is kind of weird. It makes me really drowsy, and actually gives me a fever. Not a high fever, but around 100-101, which also makes me feel crappy.

If that weren’t enough, I’ve been dealing with stress over finances, namely insurance funds, and coming up with the money for moving and medical equipment. Life should be easier when I have less rent to pay, but saving up the money to pay insurance installments three months at a time, is going to be really hard. This rough patch also doesn’t help.

Can we address the reality that my body is flaring, and there is a decent chance that the stress made it worse…and my body blistered itself. 

I’m still sort of in awe that a body is capable of doing something like that. I think most of us who deal with autoimmune issues, have moments where we’re shocked at the destructive power of our own bodies. I’ve witnessed countless things, including losing the ability to move because of hyperactive reflexes, but somehow this one blister was more intense for me. I think there was something about being able to actually see with my eyes what my body was capable of. It was as though I was in some long cold war, and then someone dropped the first bomb. I was aware I was in a flare, I knew what was going on inside of my body, but seeing it externally was a whole new game. I’ve got an oral ulcer, and a few other external signs I’m flaring, but there was something about a blister that just felt different.

My roommate has reminded me to relax, that he’s handling the movers and the moving fees, but I’ve never had to rely so much on others, and it’s definitely taking it’s toll. For now I guess it’s all I can do. IVIG can’t come fast enough.

Flare City – Autoimmune Blister and Staph Infection

ER Drama

My flare reached new levels, and once I realized I couldn’t eat or drink enough to prevent passing out, I went to the ER. Actually, I went to the ER because of that, and some persistent lower left quadrant pain and bleeding. (I also spiked a fever which was present at my doctor’s office, but ran away in time for ER arrival. Thanks.)

The first ER I went to on Tuesday. They treated me like absolute garbage. I was accused of being a drug addict even though I explained my bad veins were the result of my Behcet’s and repeated sticks and infusions. Despite them having my chart, including an admission to their affiliated hospital a little over a year ago, I was repeatedly asked what drugs I inject.

Thank for making me feel worse about myself, and for avoiding the actual reason I’m in your damn ER.

So I wait, and wait, and they put in an IV but don’t flush it…like ever…which for me means it’s borderline useless. I’m in the waiting room, with at least 40 people, and the room is made for at least half that number. People are crying, coughing, the whole plethora of possibilities. For better or worse, I’m in and out of it because I’m just so dizzy. I want IV fluids more than I’ve ever wanted them before in my life. Then, I realize I’m going to faint. I’d been waiting for over two hours at this point, I’ve asked for zofran, but wasn’t given any. I had a partial seizure, and then another, and I realize I need to tell someone, but the triage nurse keeps disappearing into the back leaving all of us sick folks to fend for ourselves (unless you’re mobile which I wasn’t).

I manage to show him the word “epilepsy” on my emergency application on my phone. (During partial seizures I often know what I want to say, but I lose the ability to say it.) He understands me, but then does nothing.

Yes folks, I tell this man via pointing that I’m going to seize, and he just sort of acknowledges me, then walks away. Thanks.

The partial intensifies and now the whole room looks funky, and I’m overcome with this sense of fear I’ve never experienced. Usually I kind of just let go and let my brain and body do what they have to do, there isn’t a point in fighting the inevitable, but this time I really fought it. Perhaps not the best idea. I wake up in the back, and I can’t get nurses and doctors back on track. I get it, I had a seizure, but I don’t remember any of it. I offer to go wait in the waiting room again. I literally was like, “Hey, I know you’re busy, I’m still woozy, but I’m not here for this, so can we just get me back to waiting for my turn?”

I ended up leaving after six hours, with no fluids, no medications other than seizure drugs, and no answers.

Wednesday rolls around and I’m sent to another ER. This time they were much nicer, but things still got shady. My lab work was normal, but per my PCM’s instructions, I got steroids. Beyond grateful! There were some hiccups, namely they were out of small IV bags so they had to push reglan slow through my IV. Between the steroids and the reglan, I got massive jitters. I was told I was being admitted and that I’d be meeting with the rheumatology team at that hospital the following day. Then things got sketchy.

I was going to be sharing a room. Not the end of the world, but not ideal when you’re immune compromised. We get to the room, and I realize sleeping with the TV on means annoying my bunkmate. I told myself I’d use my phone. As I’m trying to process all of this, I realize that the nurses are confused. The other patient is on precautions! She’s coughing in her sleep, on the other side of a flimsy curtain, and the nurses scan’t sort out why someone on reverse precautions (me) would be in a room with a patient on flu precautions (her).

I am not spending the night in the hospital with normal labs, if it means sharing a room with a flu patient!

This kicks off a debate between me and the nurses. Why am I even taking up bed space? They can’t control my nausea adequately in the hospital because there is a limit on nausea drugs in terms of dosages. I metabolize them fast, and end up constantly nauseas an annoyed by it. I’m going to be sharing a room, while vomiting, with someone who has the flu? No thanks.

To be honest a large part of it was just steroid induced panic. Had they shown up and medicated me, I’d have been okay(ish), but it just didn’t make any sense to me. Why spend the night, try and talk to a whole new rheumatology team in the morning, and expose myself to the flu amongst other nosocomial infections?

I haven’t talked to my doctor since leaving AMA. Yes, folks, I left against medical advice..only not really. The only reason I was admitted was because my PCM was worried, but the labs confirmed I didn’t have sepsis (his worry) and the doctor who was in charge of actually admitting me agreed I was fine to go home. His superior didn’t want to take the risk, hence I had to sign out AMA.

Why would they put a reverse precautions patient in with a patient who was contagious enough that nursing staff had to wear masks around her? I know the hospitals are overrun with flu cases, but that doesn’t mean that chronically ill folks should have to forgo proper care. I do wish I could have seen a rheumatology team and perhaps pushed for quicker treatment via steroids and IVIG, but they wouldn’t have been able to approve the IVIG quickly. Also, three days of high dose steroids, in hospital, while sharing a room with someone highly contagious? That is such a bad idea.

The lesson is go to your usual hospital for these things. My doctor had hoped one of the two big centers could have placed my port, but that wasn’t going to happen either, not unless it was a prolonged admission with the start of IVIG included.

That’s been the last few days! I have phlebitis in my left arm from all the sticking, and I’m still sore overall. I have been able to eat fries and tots for some reason, but only in small amounts. Carbonated water and Sonic slushes have definitely been saving me, too. I said a lot of stuff this past week that I regret, most of it due to lack of usual medication, and the addition of emergency ones. I also couldn’t think clearly because of the lack of nutrition. Now I’m stuck in this place where I regret so much of what I said, but I can’t easily take any of it back.

I wish people understood that not everyone with chronic illnesses handles emergent situations the same way, and even people who seem strong on the outside, can fall apart in strenuous circumstances.

I suppose time will tell if friends forgive me and support me still. All in all it was a really rough week, and I’m glad that it’s over. I’m hoping I’ll get some good news next week, and that I find the forgiveness of my friends, too.

ER Drama

Wheelchair Waiting

In my brain there is a list of things I have to get done. In my body there is a list of system failures that prevent me from doing the things I need to do. Us sick folks tend to triage our lives, but not all of us are aware that we’re even doing it. I put school, the dogs, and anyone who needs me, first. My social life has died a slow death over the last few years. It started with a bad relationship, then my illnesses slowly but surely made it harder and harder to socialize.

When my falling and fatigue became really bad, and the doctors started discussing mobility assistance beyond my walker, I was angry. I didn’t want to be “the girl in a wheelchair.” I also didn’t want to have to explain to people why I was in a wheelchair when I could walk. I used to take my dog down to the waterfront, and back. It was a 20-30 minute walk each way, and now I can’t go more than a block. Some days a block requires 2-3 breaks to complete.

Did I want mobility or anonymity? I could either be the girl who takes her dog to the waterfront, or someone nobody knows, because I don’t bother to leave the house. 

Today I’ve made peace with it, even with people who may ask why I have it. I know people and places that I used to commute to on foot. Now I’m waiting for the free ride system to come around, or I’m paying for ride sharing apps. I’d much rather explain that I traversed the distance in my chair, so that I could do something like go to a movie, and walk the mall afterwards, or even go putt putt golfing. There will still be days when I simply don’t have the energy to do anything, but at least with the chair I would be saving energy as often as possible.

I keep thinking about my thesis course that starts in a month. I’ll have to be on campus once per week for 2+ months. Once I have the chair, I’m not worried about it. As it stands right now, I am worried. Walking to and from the bus stop, is a challenge. The last time I did it, I started to pass out during class, and had to leave early. The chair, as constraining as it may seem, actually gives me more freedom.

Today that’s all I can think about. I want to go see a movie, but I simply can’t muster up the energy. The plan is to go see it tomorrow after I get my vitamin infusions. (Barring of course, any major allergic reactions!) I still can’t wait for IVIG, either. I hate throwing all of my hope on one treatment option, but it’s really all we have left, so it’s what I would like to start doing as soon as we can.

Head up.

Chin up.


Wheelchair Waiting

Very Hard Day

I am an emotional eater, which would be fine if it weren’t for gastroparesis. Last night there were a few things that frazzled me, on top of it already being a busy night because of New Year’s Eve. NYE is my favorite holiday, and between some random events, and fighting off a cold, I’ve been left paying for it. I took a two hour nap, and I’m legitimately contemplating going to bed right now…it isn’t even 7pm.

Chronic illness takes a lot out of you, so when something happens that would leave a “normal” person tired, it can leave a chronically ill person super exhausted. Today it hurts to even move. I can’t imagine doing anything other than sleeping. I’m hoping my roommate takes my dog out…and I ate too much. The nausea and pain are definitely not enjoyable, but at least some of what I ate had nutrition I needed, namely protein.

This is one of those situations where I want to conquer the world, but I know I have to just relax and allow my body a chance to recover. Despite my seizure medications, I’ve had several moments where I thought I was about to have a seizure today. It’s worrisome. I’m hoping I don’t because I don’t want to deal with it. I know I should be more concerned about how a seizure impacts my body and brain, but I know all of that. My main concern is just not wanting to deal with my roommate being worried, potentially dealing with EMS, and even ending up in the ER.

I keep telling myself it’s okay to take a day to just recover, but I also want to conquer today because I swore I’d be a fighter in 2018, Of course, knowing when to relax is part of being a fighter…

Perhaps a shower will help things. It may just put me to sleep, but that isn’t the worst outcome. I don’t nap, so if I do, it’s usually a sign my body really needs the rest. I didn’t go to bed until around 4:30am, and I’d taken sleeping medication far earlier. That means the drugs wore off and I was left attempting to fend for myself and sleep naturally. I can only sleep in short spurts, hence the naps today.

I am not a quitter if I take a day off from being positive. I know that, and I have to embrace that. I didn’t have a good evening. I mean I did, then I didn’t, and the chaos and emotional aspects flared up the already active flare that i’ve been in. It was the kind of thing that leaves all parts of you raw. Despite the resolution, and the rational thinking I’m so fond of, I need to allow myself the ability to be angry, and sad.

Today is not a good day physically, and it’s a rough day emotionally, so together they’re feeding on one another, creating even more aggravating physical symptoms. Acknowledging that, and sleeping when I need to sleep, is the right thing to do. It may feel like giving up, but it’s really just recharging.

I am not a quitter.

Giving up isn’t an option, but taking a time out is. So today is a time out, a moment to listen to my body, and use heating pads and hot water bottles, to treat the aches and pains. Sleeping at random hours, and for long periods, is giving my brain the chance it needs to relax. (Please note: there was a long pause after the phrase “needs to,” because I literally couldn’t figure out something other than recharge to place afterwards. Clearly I should listen and take another nap!)

Happy New Year. Listen to your body regardless of whether or not it’s a holiday. You are your body’s best advocate, so be the best you can be.

Very Hard Day

Changing Your Expectations and Being Okay with It

I have had to change so many of my expectations over the last few years, and you would think it would get less painful each time…but it doesn’t. When my ex-husband and I separated, it was a relief. It wasn’t a good marriage, despite being a long marriage, and the freedom from the constant verbal and emotional tirades was beyond amazing. My health had momentarily improved, leading me to believe that I would be so much better physically, because I had freed myself emotionally. It was partially true. My C-PTSD symptoms did decrease, to the point where my medications could be removed, but my Behcet’s didn’t get the notice.

Denial was my first mistake. I refused to accept that the symptoms I was having were Behcet’s related. Wasn’t I always uncoordinated? Didn’t I always have stomach issues? Finances were a mess because I’d blown my knee out, so the stress was of course causing me some physical distress. I made so many excuses for so many obvious signs of flaring, that I was eventually sitting in the medical marijuana office, weighing in at 120 pounds, all 5’10” of me. I got my medical license to smoke, and for the first time ever, tried marijuana. At that point I was struggling to keep down water.

My second mistake was over optimism. Let me explain this further. Being optimistic is wonderful. You need to be positive to stay on track and fight your chronic illnesses. Being overly optimistic, though, prevents you from planning realistically. I kept telling myself every treatment change would work. When it didn’t, I just kept pushing forward. I pushed my body to the limit because I was still in denial. I had a boss prior to getting sicker, who was into positive thinking so seriously, that we literally couldn’t express any negative feelings. I clung to the idea even after leaving the job.

The final mistake was combining mistakes one and two, with lying. I lied to my family. I lied to my friends. I told people I was fine, and when they saw me, they were floored by how not fine I was. By the point I was going to NYU, where they would recommend Remicade and if that didn’t work, Cytoxan, I had been hospitalized for over a week, and was barely able to walk with a walker.

Denial, overly optimistic thinking, and lying to yourself and others, is not going to help you.

I still believe there will be a day when my illness doesn’t impact me day to day, because I’ll have treatments and tools at my disposal, but I am still coming to terms with that reality. Some days I will need my wheelchair. I will likely need IVIG regularly, for quite some time, if not indefinitely. Remission is out of the question, but given how aggressive my case has been, it isn’t likely.

And that’s okay.

That may sound like over optimism again, but it isn’t. I will adjust my life as needed, and with time, I will be able to find things that I can enjoy and do with whatever my body is capable of. I don’t know if anyone will ever be able to love me enough to live with me and commit to me, and while the thought of never settling down and actually living with someone hurts, I do know that it’s a possibility. I also know that there are people out there with chronic illnesses who have found partners, so it isn’t impossible. The first step, though, is accepting myself, and my body, for what it is.

My schooling changed. My potential career paths changed. It hurts. I wanted to be a clinical laboratory scientist more than anything, and I may not be able to ever pursue that path because of my ataxia. What I have found, though, is clinical study associate positions, and they’re actually really interesting. To be honest, I should have gotten my MPH (Master’s of Public Health), but I wasn’t as sick when I committed to the forensic program. Ultimately I can still get certificates for clinical study administration, and because of my undergraduate and different graduate degree, I could make a case that I would be an excellent advisor. I’ve literally studied the lab piece of things, and the investigative side of forensics, I am the perfect person to put together official studies that pair the work that is seen, with the behind the scenes work.

I have literally discovered a career I never knew existed, and it’s in demand where I live. I can also do it in a wheelchair, and even handle some administrative tasks from home.

Currently I’m not in a position to work, but I want to be working someday, and this career field gives me hope. Regardless I love the idea. I could also look into PhD programs with my undergraduate and graduate school, because they have agreements with certain degree programs, where they pay for your PhD if you give them 5 years of your time as a professor. I would actually enjoy teaching college students, and the flexibility of the potential online classes is amazing. Even if I had to do in person instruction, the ability to do it in a wheelchair also makes it a viable option.

Mostly it’s about recognizing that I even have options.

You may not be doing what you thought you’d be doing, but very few people in their 30’s are where they thought they’d be in their teens or even early 20’s. The friends I think that have it all, don’t really all have it all. I come from a small town and most of my friends have gotten married and had kids, but there are others like myself, who got married young and then got divorced. I’m glad I didn’t have kids with my ex-husband, because we would never have been able to peacefully coparent. I also wouldn’t be able to focus on getting myself well, if I had children to look after.

I am not where I want to be, but I am still here, and I still have the opportunity to move in a variety of directions. I just need to be open to the options that I have.

Changing Your Expectations and Being Okay with It

First Round of IV Vitamins, and the Unemployment/Disability Situation

Yesterday, on the 23rd, I got my first infusion of fluids vitamins, and amino acids. It wasn’t pleasant, but mostly because I was still so sick going into the appointment. Basically I’m still having bleeding issues, most likely from my colon, and lower intestines. I’m also having a lot of nausea courtesy of the gastroparesis. I find myself in this horrible situation where, if my stomach and upper intestines empty, they hit the lower intestines where the ulcerations are. So the nausea fades momentarily, only to return as the pain of the food and drink moving through me hits the ulcers. The doctors are fairly sure some of the ulcers were deep, and created blood clot like scabs that are coming off when I feel like I have to go to the bathroom. It’s super fun…

Anyhow, I pulled myself up off the bathroom floor (literally) and went in for the infusion. I was pleasantly surprised when the nurse hit a vein on the first try. (I had forced myself to drink and keep down liquids, though it had left me violently nauseated.) She warned me that the infusion would taste funny, like a Flintstone vitamin. Turns out it tasted exactly like one, but not the fun fruity part…the gross after taste part. This would have been manageable had I brought mints or something, but I hadn’t. It also would have been manageable if I weren’t already trying to avoid throwing up. Then there was the woman who seemed determined to talk to me.

I am pale, obviously in pain, and she just kept talking…

I’m not sure what we talked about. I grunted responses periodically, but spent most of the time checking out her adorable dog. Then something fun happened. About halfway through the bag I thought I was dying. I felt hot flashes, the nausea peaked, and I was pretty convinced I was going to faint or have a seizure. Then, a little while later, it all went away. I told myself it was just the Zofran I had taken prior to the infusion…but I kept feeling less horrendous. Now, don’t get me wrong, the damn thing still tasted awful, but I didn’t feel as awful. 3/4 of the way through the infusion, I was actually sitting up in the chair instead of half curled over. As it finished I had to admit, I felt a lot better, just from the fluids. The vitamins were much needed, but I am sure they haven’t done much just yet. The nurses and nutritionist had all said it would take several regular infusions before I felt a lasting benefit from the vitamins and amino acids. As I’m getting up to leave, talkative lady addresses me and the nurse.

“You look less dead.” Then to the nurse, “Doesn’t she look a lot less dead?”

I mean I’d rather look totally alive, but I’ll take less dead I suppose. My stomach still hasn’t been doing well, but that’s just the nature of the situation. My upper GI doesn’t want to move at all, while the lower GI is a mess of ulcerations and blood. Happy holidays I suppose.

Hopefully I can get an update on my wheelchair after the holiday. I’m bummed that I’ll have to start paying copayments and whatnot, given my insurance year will begin again, but I’m hoping I won’t have to pay it all at once with the wheelchair. That would definitely require me to sell everything I own. I’m also excited to start IVIG. I’m crossing my fingers for some good news regarding my disability as well.

For a long time I was opposed to the idea of disability. I want to work. Not working leaves me unfulfilled. It isn’t even about finances, though I’m definitely struggling financially. Working has always given me a sense of pride and purpose. Even the smallest job made me feel like I was contributing in some way. Without working I feel sort of useless. I know I couldn’t work the way things are right now. As much as I may want to work, I just don’t know day to day how I’ll feel. Plus there are the medical treatments. We’re talking about IV infusions 2x per week, if insurance will cover it, then IVIG which will be given over a period of two days. From what I’ve read IVIG is done every 4-6 weeks. If it lines up with IV nutrition appointments, I could be spending 4 out of 5 days in medical offices one week per month. I’d still be spending two days per week in medical offices anyhow. Once we’re able, we’ll wean me to an IV per week, but ultimately we can’t go lower than that since I really need the fluids.

This is the thing people don’t seem to grasp about disability, and those of us who are chronically ill. We fight hard to get to a baseline that is somewhat close to that of a healthy person. Most of us won’t ever feel as healthy as a healthy person, but we can fight hard to become functional enough to basically pass as healthy. Getting to that point takes a lot of effort and time though. In my instance we’re talking several IV treatments, a ton of oral medications, and carefully orchestrated drinks and snacks. Even with all of that, I could wake up and feel miserable. If you look at my IV schedule alone, it become a scheduling nightmare. Toss in the fact my body doesn’t operate well in the mornings, and that I could randomly have a few bad days without warning, and you get someone who really doesn’t have the ability to work right now.

I am not defined by my illness, however, I am limited by it. For a long time I lied to myself, and swore that Behcet’s and the things it has caused like gastroparesis and autonomic neuropathy, would never limit me. I was determined to live the life I wanted, despite the symptoms. As I pushed myself, I got sicker and sicker. Then denial kicked in. I told myself that I was in a flare, and that once the flare was over, I could get back to living a normal life. Denial isn’t helpful. I hit a point where I had to acknowledge that some of the things I wanted to do, I couldn’t do, because of my chronic illnesses, and that’s okay.

Yes, you read that right folks, it’s okay to accept that your disease limits you…as long as you don’t let it define the entirety of your being.

I am chronically ill. I may have to use my wheelchair at times. I cannot work. My diet is an absolute wreck, and even when I do follow the doctor’s advice, I can’t always succeed. The ER team knows me. Professors have to allow me extra time should I require it. These are all facts of life for me. I accept it, and I pivot because of it.

Find something else that you love, and know that limitations are not forever, but even the ones that do stick around don’t change who you are as a person. 

Life is what it is, and sometimes we can’t wrap our heads around having to change our plans, but we also can find ourselves trying something new that we hadn’t even thought of before. We find new passions, new paths, and we go with it.

So go with it. 

First Round of IV Vitamins, and the Unemployment/Disability Situation