Governmental Nonsense and Way Too Many Tears

Getting affordable insurance is still insanely hard if you’re chronically ill and unable to work. Part of the problem is that getting disability is hard. If you have income, even if that income isn’t from working, and even if it doesn’t cover all of your bills, you’re sort of shuffled to the back of the line (or so it feels). Disability would qualify me for MediCal which is what I’m trying to get, but I’m $200 over the limit, and that’s enough for them. It doesn’t matter that I can’t pay my other bills, I’m over the limit.

They actually just suggested I decrease my alimony so that I would qualify. Are you kidding me? I’ve already expressed the reality that if my roommate didn’t cover so many of my bills, I’d be homeless already. 

I swallowed my pride and got the information for a charity that helps, and I’m hoping they can provide some help so I can keep insurance for a few more months at the very least.  I also need to talk to my ex at some point, and inform him that I’m changing banks. I emailed him but I don’t know which email he actually uses to be honest. (He has several from when he was cheating, that he still has activated, so it’s impossible to really know what is going on with that. I suppose I’ll have to text him, too.

Funny how part of the divorce agreement was me making sure he knew where I was at all times (phone, email, address), but I don’t get any of the same luxuries.

It’s odd being sick. I took an unexpected 3+ hour nap after trying to write this earlier, because I’d sobbed myself into incoherence. There is a hopelessness once you’re in the disability system. You’re lied to by the ease with which temporary disability can be obtained. When you realize your disability isn’t temporary, and apply for permanent disability, you’re struck with the truth. It takes forever, and the details don’t often make sense.

Now the best way to get MediCal, is to be officially disabled, but hey, fun fact, that process takes, on average FOUR years.

You want less homeless folks San Diego? Help get them enrolled in disability, of some sort, because many have mental health issues or physical issues that, if fixed, would allow them to work. Additionally, let’s get more drug rehabilitation facilities for those who want or need them, because that will also help. And build some affordable housing!

These programs that exist to help, they want you making less than around $1300 a month, which is a glorious theory, but completely unreasonable for San Diego. Now it’s 2am and I’m debating how peaceful my sleep will honestly be, given all the crying I did today (and that unbelievably ridiculous nap. People were actually worried because I just crashed so hard. I think I may have swapped my indica heavy and sativa heavy pens, because OOF.

And before people judge, medical marijuana is literally the only thing that stops the vomiting sometimes. If we find out my GI transit time is slow, but not so slow it can’t be managed, there is a chance I’ll be given IV access for nausea drugs. The only issue is that means life with a needle in my chest. I’ll also likely be running fluids (if I have a say) because drinking less means I can try and eat more, and more of what’s on my nutritional plan, but we will see.

Let’s hope tomorrow (well today), brings less tear inducing drama. 

 

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Governmental Nonsense and Way Too Many Tears

Chronic Illness is Not Enviable or “Cool”, And Gastroparesis is NOT an Eating Disorder

A few years back, a seemingly healthy friend of mine, expressed jealousy over the fact that I could have my dog in apartments that were, otherwise, not pet friendly. I explained that he had been an emotional support animal, before I realized he could sense my seizures and heart rate changes. At that point he was trained to be both a medical alert dog, as well as a psychiatric service dog. (Back then I was struggling with some major side effects from PTSD. Today they’re under control, though I do still appreciate my dogs waking me up if I do have a night terror.)

She would, eventually, announce that she had PTSD as well, and promptly run out and adopt a “service dog” of her own. All of it was whatever, until she started trying to convince folks with very little, or even no, trauma, that they too, could have PTSD. Ever feel anxious in social situations? You probably have PTSD. It was absurd, and I told her as much. It was suddenly this popular thing. Emotional support animals were getting scrutinized, but psychiatric service dogs became a loophole. They’re totally legitimate, but seem to be easier for some folks to sneak through the system, which is just sad.

The breaking point came when my struggles with gastroparesis became extreme. This was prior to chemotherapy, when I was really thin. My frailness, something that prevented me from going out and enjoying life, became this enviable thing. Someone with an eating disorder clung to it, and decided that they could eat whatever they’d like, vomit, blame it on gastroparesis, and gain sympathy.

It worked.

I still didn’t really think much about it at the time, or even now, because we all have our own battles. What I did think about, and what I still become aggravated with, is this idea that gastroparesis is an eating disorder. After years of being accused of anorexia or bulimia, finding myself in that viewfinder again, was beyond aggravating. I wanted to eat, desperately, and I wanted to drink even more, but I simply couldn’t overcome the nausea. It wasn’t worth eating just to be sick. Some people with GP, will eat, and get sick, either because they want to attempt to eat, or they miss the taste of food, and a small percent I’m sure, do have true eating disorders on top of the GP. Eating disorders can also cause GP, but it can be reversible in some cases.

I am not in the reversible category, and I need people to accept that.

I have good days and bad days with gastroparesis, but it never goes away. A good day can actually cause a string of bad days if I’m not fully aware of what I’m consuming. My behavior may look eating disorder like, but the reality is I can’t digest as much as I may want. A good day means I’m not as nauseas, or I may even have an increase of collateral blood flow, letting me digest…but my GP doesn’t go away.

There is a condition called median arcuate ligament syndrome, or MALS. With MALS, the arcuate ligament runs in an odd manner, and causes impingement of the celiac artery. This results in a lack of blood flow to the stomach, liver, and some other stuff in that area. It can also cause compression of nerves. In a nutshell, you get abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, lack of appetite, and all that fun stuff. Surgery helps some patients, but not all patients, and the theory behind this statistic is that patients who have nerve damage, will have continued pain.

I don’t have MALS…but I do have significant celiac artery stenosis. They can’t stent it, they don’t know what causes it, and it’s significant enough, that spasms from my vasculitis, could cause it to close off completely, worsening the pain, and gastroparesis episodes.

Except of course, doctors don’t love that conversation, because having your celiac artery narrowed to about 90%, like mine is, when you don’t have atherosclerosis, is weird. Also, even with atherosclerosis, the celiac artery would be an odd point of discovery. Some doctors agree, my celiac artery is the cause of the gastroparesis and other upper GI issues, especially when combined with my chronic gastritis. Other doctors refuse to even approach the subject. When MALS is understood, accepted, and still debated, being that one random patient with a bum celiac artery, tends to sort of become something that your doctors ignore.

I won’t wake up one day and be able to eat normally. I always have pain when I eat…always. Even friends who get excited to see me eat a meal, don’t understand the effort. I will have pain. I will have nausea. I may actually need to sit a certain way, use a hot pack, something, to alleviate the discomfort. Once we hit my intestines it’s really a toss up as to how that will go. There is always some pain due to dehydration, and the stool softeners and laxatives I’m required to take. Some sections don’t always work. Other sections are sometimes ulcered. It’s a fun time down there.

So when someone tells me that I will “heal” my gut as I move through my “eating disorder” like they did, I want to scream. 

Being sick is not something that gets you the kind of attention you might think you’ll get. I want love. I want to build a career and a life. Spending time in infusion chairs, ERs, doctors’ offices, it’s all just a lot of stuff that gets in the way of living life. Yeah, my wheelchair helps me get around, but now that I don’t live downtown, where will I go? You can’t put it in a car, so it leaves me stranded unless I take the bus, something I’ve yet to attempt.

I may start a day feeling good, go to an event, and end up with legs that won’t work. It’s funny how the people who seem to be disability envious, who suddenly find themselves with the same conditions, only have issues when they’re home alone, or want to hang out with friends who seem to have plans that they don’t have the ability to participate in for some reason other than their health. If you always feel healthy enough for parties, concerts, and other leisure activities, but suddenly seem violently ill to avoid obligations, or garner attention, I’m going to question your sincerity. I’m not talking about a recovery day (or week) because I know that one good day for me, when pushed to far, can definitely screw me up. It’s the people who seem to cling to the fringes of the disabled or “spoonie” communities, join somehow, but always seem to have luck when it comes to when their condition will flare up.

Today is a hard day, because I find myself bitter. I want this life I cannot have. This isn’t something positive thinking can fix. Most of the time I do accept my circumstances, and I work to find things that can make me just as happy, if not happier, than my original plans. It doesn’t mean I don’t get angry sometimes. When someone gleefully jumps into the sick people community, only to have oddly good luck in terms of when they’re actually sick, and when they’re not, I struggle to bite my tongue.

Be interested, be included, but don’t lie. Even a small illness deserves support. Hell, all people deserve support. You don’t have to fake being seriously ill to get it.

 

Chronic Illness is Not Enviable or “Cool”, And Gastroparesis is NOT an Eating Disorder

Reflections and Fevers and Dehydration (oh my)

This staph infection sucks in a bizarre way. It’s relatively healed but of course I need to keep taking antibiotics. I won’t finish the full course, and I never do. My doctors are okay with it at this point given how horrendously they impact my body. I wasn’t able to go get blood work done today because the man delivering my wheelchair had a fever, so he moved my appointment to Wednesday. I need the chair to get to the lab, therefore, no blood work.

In any event, the blood work is for the allergist, and until that is done, antibiotics and I are still not on great terms. Of course, infections and I don’t get along so well either. He had explained that my body may be hypersensitive in general, and any infection, certain drugs, and certain foods and drinks, can all trigger allergic type responses. The idea makes total sense to me, given that I’ve told nurses for years, “I’m allergic to nothing and everything,” to explain random bouts of hives. It just sucks that Tylenol does nothing for any of my pain, and is now the only acceptable pain reliever per the allergies.

Yes, the doctors did okay the discontinuation of antibiotics early, if my symptoms had resolved. No, I’m not lying.

There is a valid reason for this aside from the allergy issue…antibiotics just make me really really sick. I’ve had suspected C. diff on more than one occasion, and after weeks of constipation, I am officially no longer backed up, courtesy of the Keflex. Of course any antibiotic can cause diarrhea. They treated me for C. diff once, without culturing me, and it resolved, but I hadn’t finished those antibiotics either due to an allergic reaction. Why not get tested to see if it’s hanging out in my gut? First off, you have to have diarrhea to have the test done. (You can only provide a liquid sample. No solids at all or the test can’t be done.) Secondly, I don’t want to be put into isolation for-freaking-ever.

I’m not explaining to anyone who ever visits me in the hospital, that I’m in a gown and whatnot room, because I’ve got C. diff just hanging out in my bum. 

Yes, I know it isn’t that dramatic, but please. I have so much going on, I don’t need that added to it. The antibiotics have somehow increased my bowel movements, but decreased my appetite. I think the low grade fever and nausea is probably to blame. As much as I need the wheelchair as soon as possible, I’m also dreading it. There is something about a power chair, that for me, seems so much more dire. I see someone in a manual chair, even if it has some sort of power assist, and I figure they’re okay. I see the power chair, and my mind just goes straight to sickly things. I feel weird that testing showed that as the best option, even though I know with my hyperactive reflexes and ataxia that it makes sense. I guess I’m just insecure.

Now to go and walk the dogs with a fever, the shakes, and dehydration. I did manage to drink some of a cherry slush, and eat some tots to provide my body with some needed salt, but I simply don’t feel like waiting for an elevator and going down 24 floors. This move can’t come soon enough. The idea of being just 2 floors up, and better yet, not being in a city with the rats, cockroaches, and hepatitis A outbreak. The rat realization was new, and while I love them as pets, the ones that live on the streets definitely harbor disease. It’ll be nice removing that element from my daily struggle.

It’s hard explaining to people who think you look like you’re doing well, just how much effort it takes to put on that facade.

Reflections and Fevers and Dehydration (oh my)

ER Drama

My flare reached new levels, and once I realized I couldn’t eat or drink enough to prevent passing out, I went to the ER. Actually, I went to the ER because of that, and some persistent lower left quadrant pain and bleeding. (I also spiked a fever which was present at my doctor’s office, but ran away in time for ER arrival. Thanks.)

The first ER I went to on Tuesday. They treated me like absolute garbage. I was accused of being a drug addict even though I explained my bad veins were the result of my Behcet’s and repeated sticks and infusions. Despite them having my chart, including an admission to their affiliated hospital a little over a year ago, I was repeatedly asked what drugs I inject.

Thank for making me feel worse about myself, and for avoiding the actual reason I’m in your damn ER.

So I wait, and wait, and they put in an IV but don’t flush it…like ever…which for me means it’s borderline useless. I’m in the waiting room, with at least 40 people, and the room is made for at least half that number. People are crying, coughing, the whole plethora of possibilities. For better or worse, I’m in and out of it because I’m just so dizzy. I want IV fluids more than I’ve ever wanted them before in my life. Then, I realize I’m going to faint. I’d been waiting for over two hours at this point, I’ve asked for zofran, but wasn’t given any. I had a partial seizure, and then another, and I realize I need to tell someone, but the triage nurse keeps disappearing into the back leaving all of us sick folks to fend for ourselves (unless you’re mobile which I wasn’t).

I manage to show him the word “epilepsy” on my emergency application on my phone. (During partial seizures I often know what I want to say, but I lose the ability to say it.) He understands me, but then does nothing.

Yes folks, I tell this man via pointing that I’m going to seize, and he just sort of acknowledges me, then walks away. Thanks.

The partial intensifies and now the whole room looks funky, and I’m overcome with this sense of fear I’ve never experienced. Usually I kind of just let go and let my brain and body do what they have to do, there isn’t a point in fighting the inevitable, but this time I really fought it. Perhaps not the best idea. I wake up in the back, and I can’t get nurses and doctors back on track. I get it, I had a seizure, but I don’t remember any of it. I offer to go wait in the waiting room again. I literally was like, “Hey, I know you’re busy, I’m still woozy, but I’m not here for this, so can we just get me back to waiting for my turn?”

I ended up leaving after six hours, with no fluids, no medications other than seizure drugs, and no answers.

Wednesday rolls around and I’m sent to another ER. This time they were much nicer, but things still got shady. My lab work was normal, but per my PCM’s instructions, I got steroids. Beyond grateful! There were some hiccups, namely they were out of small IV bags so they had to push reglan slow through my IV. Between the steroids and the reglan, I got massive jitters. I was told I was being admitted and that I’d be meeting with the rheumatology team at that hospital the following day. Then things got sketchy.

I was going to be sharing a room. Not the end of the world, but not ideal when you’re immune compromised. We get to the room, and I realize sleeping with the TV on means annoying my bunkmate. I told myself I’d use my phone. As I’m trying to process all of this, I realize that the nurses are confused. The other patient is on precautions! She’s coughing in her sleep, on the other side of a flimsy curtain, and the nurses scan’t sort out why someone on reverse precautions (me) would be in a room with a patient on flu precautions (her).

I am not spending the night in the hospital with normal labs, if it means sharing a room with a flu patient!

This kicks off a debate between me and the nurses. Why am I even taking up bed space? They can’t control my nausea adequately in the hospital because there is a limit on nausea drugs in terms of dosages. I metabolize them fast, and end up constantly nauseas an annoyed by it. I’m going to be sharing a room, while vomiting, with someone who has the flu? No thanks.

To be honest a large part of it was just steroid induced panic. Had they shown up and medicated me, I’d have been okay(ish), but it just didn’t make any sense to me. Why spend the night, try and talk to a whole new rheumatology team in the morning, and expose myself to the flu amongst other nosocomial infections?

I haven’t talked to my doctor since leaving AMA. Yes, folks, I left against medical advice..only not really. The only reason I was admitted was because my PCM was worried, but the labs confirmed I didn’t have sepsis (his worry) and the doctor who was in charge of actually admitting me agreed I was fine to go home. His superior didn’t want to take the risk, hence I had to sign out AMA.

Why would they put a reverse precautions patient in with a patient who was contagious enough that nursing staff had to wear masks around her? I know the hospitals are overrun with flu cases, but that doesn’t mean that chronically ill folks should have to forgo proper care. I do wish I could have seen a rheumatology team and perhaps pushed for quicker treatment via steroids and IVIG, but they wouldn’t have been able to approve the IVIG quickly. Also, three days of high dose steroids, in hospital, while sharing a room with someone highly contagious? That is such a bad idea.

The lesson is go to your usual hospital for these things. My doctor had hoped one of the two big centers could have placed my port, but that wasn’t going to happen either, not unless it was a prolonged admission with the start of IVIG included.

That’s been the last few days! I have phlebitis in my left arm from all the sticking, and I’m still sore overall. I have been able to eat fries and tots for some reason, but only in small amounts. Carbonated water and Sonic slushes have definitely been saving me, too. I said a lot of stuff this past week that I regret, most of it due to lack of usual medication, and the addition of emergency ones. I also couldn’t think clearly because of the lack of nutrition. Now I’m stuck in this place where I regret so much of what I said, but I can’t easily take any of it back.

I wish people understood that not everyone with chronic illnesses handles emergent situations the same way, and even people who seem strong on the outside, can fall apart in strenuous circumstances.

I suppose time will tell if friends forgive me and support me still. All in all it was a really rough week, and I’m glad that it’s over. I’m hoping I’ll get some good news next week, and that I find the forgiveness of my friends, too.

ER Drama

Changing Your Expectations and Being Okay with It

I have had to change so many of my expectations over the last few years, and you would think it would get less painful each time…but it doesn’t. When my ex-husband and I separated, it was a relief. It wasn’t a good marriage, despite being a long marriage, and the freedom from the constant verbal and emotional tirades was beyond amazing. My health had momentarily improved, leading me to believe that I would be so much better physically, because I had freed myself emotionally. It was partially true. My C-PTSD symptoms did decrease, to the point where my medications could be removed, but my Behcet’s didn’t get the notice.

Denial was my first mistake. I refused to accept that the symptoms I was having were Behcet’s related. Wasn’t I always uncoordinated? Didn’t I always have stomach issues? Finances were a mess because I’d blown my knee out, so the stress was of course causing me some physical distress. I made so many excuses for so many obvious signs of flaring, that I was eventually sitting in the medical marijuana office, weighing in at 120 pounds, all 5’10” of me. I got my medical license to smoke, and for the first time ever, tried marijuana. At that point I was struggling to keep down water.

My second mistake was over optimism. Let me explain this further. Being optimistic is wonderful. You need to be positive to stay on track and fight your chronic illnesses. Being overly optimistic, though, prevents you from planning realistically. I kept telling myself every treatment change would work. When it didn’t, I just kept pushing forward. I pushed my body to the limit because I was still in denial. I had a boss prior to getting sicker, who was into positive thinking so seriously, that we literally couldn’t express any negative feelings. I clung to the idea even after leaving the job.

The final mistake was combining mistakes one and two, with lying. I lied to my family. I lied to my friends. I told people I was fine, and when they saw me, they were floored by how not fine I was. By the point I was going to NYU, where they would recommend Remicade and if that didn’t work, Cytoxan, I had been hospitalized for over a week, and was barely able to walk with a walker.

Denial, overly optimistic thinking, and lying to yourself and others, is not going to help you.

I still believe there will be a day when my illness doesn’t impact me day to day, because I’ll have treatments and tools at my disposal, but I am still coming to terms with that reality. Some days I will need my wheelchair. I will likely need IVIG regularly, for quite some time, if not indefinitely. Remission is out of the question, but given how aggressive my case has been, it isn’t likely.

And that’s okay.

That may sound like over optimism again, but it isn’t. I will adjust my life as needed, and with time, I will be able to find things that I can enjoy and do with whatever my body is capable of. I don’t know if anyone will ever be able to love me enough to live with me and commit to me, and while the thought of never settling down and actually living with someone hurts, I do know that it’s a possibility. I also know that there are people out there with chronic illnesses who have found partners, so it isn’t impossible. The first step, though, is accepting myself, and my body, for what it is.

My schooling changed. My potential career paths changed. It hurts. I wanted to be a clinical laboratory scientist more than anything, and I may not be able to ever pursue that path because of my ataxia. What I have found, though, is clinical study associate positions, and they’re actually really interesting. To be honest, I should have gotten my MPH (Master’s of Public Health), but I wasn’t as sick when I committed to the forensic program. Ultimately I can still get certificates for clinical study administration, and because of my undergraduate and different graduate degree, I could make a case that I would be an excellent advisor. I’ve literally studied the lab piece of things, and the investigative side of forensics, I am the perfect person to put together official studies that pair the work that is seen, with the behind the scenes work.

I have literally discovered a career I never knew existed, and it’s in demand where I live. I can also do it in a wheelchair, and even handle some administrative tasks from home.

Currently I’m not in a position to work, but I want to be working someday, and this career field gives me hope. Regardless I love the idea. I could also look into PhD programs with my undergraduate and graduate school, because they have agreements with certain degree programs, where they pay for your PhD if you give them 5 years of your time as a professor. I would actually enjoy teaching college students, and the flexibility of the potential online classes is amazing. Even if I had to do in person instruction, the ability to do it in a wheelchair also makes it a viable option.

Mostly it’s about recognizing that I even have options.

You may not be doing what you thought you’d be doing, but very few people in their 30’s are where they thought they’d be in their teens or even early 20’s. The friends I think that have it all, don’t really all have it all. I come from a small town and most of my friends have gotten married and had kids, but there are others like myself, who got married young and then got divorced. I’m glad I didn’t have kids with my ex-husband, because we would never have been able to peacefully coparent. I also wouldn’t be able to focus on getting myself well, if I had children to look after.

I am not where I want to be, but I am still here, and I still have the opportunity to move in a variety of directions. I just need to be open to the options that I have.

Changing Your Expectations and Being Okay with It

First Round of IV Vitamins, and the Unemployment/Disability Situation

Yesterday, on the 23rd, I got my first infusion of fluids vitamins, and amino acids. It wasn’t pleasant, but mostly because I was still so sick going into the appointment. Basically I’m still having bleeding issues, most likely from my colon, and lower intestines. I’m also having a lot of nausea courtesy of the gastroparesis. I find myself in this horrible situation where, if my stomach and upper intestines empty, they hit the lower intestines where the ulcerations are. So the nausea fades momentarily, only to return as the pain of the food and drink moving through me hits the ulcers. The doctors are fairly sure some of the ulcers were deep, and created blood clot like scabs that are coming off when I feel like I have to go to the bathroom. It’s super fun…

Anyhow, I pulled myself up off the bathroom floor (literally) and went in for the infusion. I was pleasantly surprised when the nurse hit a vein on the first try. (I had forced myself to drink and keep down liquids, though it had left me violently nauseated.) She warned me that the infusion would taste funny, like a Flintstone vitamin. Turns out it tasted exactly like one, but not the fun fruity part…the gross after taste part. This would have been manageable had I brought mints or something, but I hadn’t. It also would have been manageable if I weren’t already trying to avoid throwing up. Then there was the woman who seemed determined to talk to me.

I am pale, obviously in pain, and she just kept talking…

I’m not sure what we talked about. I grunted responses periodically, but spent most of the time checking out her adorable dog. Then something fun happened. About halfway through the bag I thought I was dying. I felt hot flashes, the nausea peaked, and I was pretty convinced I was going to faint or have a seizure. Then, a little while later, it all went away. I told myself it was just the Zofran I had taken prior to the infusion…but I kept feeling less horrendous. Now, don’t get me wrong, the damn thing still tasted awful, but I didn’t feel as awful. 3/4 of the way through the infusion, I was actually sitting up in the chair instead of half curled over. As it finished I had to admit, I felt a lot better, just from the fluids. The vitamins were much needed, but I am sure they haven’t done much just yet. The nurses and nutritionist had all said it would take several regular infusions before I felt a lasting benefit from the vitamins and amino acids. As I’m getting up to leave, talkative lady addresses me and the nurse.

“You look less dead.” Then to the nurse, “Doesn’t she look a lot less dead?”

I mean I’d rather look totally alive, but I’ll take less dead I suppose. My stomach still hasn’t been doing well, but that’s just the nature of the situation. My upper GI doesn’t want to move at all, while the lower GI is a mess of ulcerations and blood. Happy holidays I suppose.

Hopefully I can get an update on my wheelchair after the holiday. I’m bummed that I’ll have to start paying copayments and whatnot, given my insurance year will begin again, but I’m hoping I won’t have to pay it all at once with the wheelchair. That would definitely require me to sell everything I own. I’m also excited to start IVIG. I’m crossing my fingers for some good news regarding my disability as well.

For a long time I was opposed to the idea of disability. I want to work. Not working leaves me unfulfilled. It isn’t even about finances, though I’m definitely struggling financially. Working has always given me a sense of pride and purpose. Even the smallest job made me feel like I was contributing in some way. Without working I feel sort of useless. I know I couldn’t work the way things are right now. As much as I may want to work, I just don’t know day to day how I’ll feel. Plus there are the medical treatments. We’re talking about IV infusions 2x per week, if insurance will cover it, then IVIG which will be given over a period of two days. From what I’ve read IVIG is done every 4-6 weeks. If it lines up with IV nutrition appointments, I could be spending 4 out of 5 days in medical offices one week per month. I’d still be spending two days per week in medical offices anyhow. Once we’re able, we’ll wean me to an IV per week, but ultimately we can’t go lower than that since I really need the fluids.

This is the thing people don’t seem to grasp about disability, and those of us who are chronically ill. We fight hard to get to a baseline that is somewhat close to that of a healthy person. Most of us won’t ever feel as healthy as a healthy person, but we can fight hard to become functional enough to basically pass as healthy. Getting to that point takes a lot of effort and time though. In my instance we’re talking several IV treatments, a ton of oral medications, and carefully orchestrated drinks and snacks. Even with all of that, I could wake up and feel miserable. If you look at my IV schedule alone, it become a scheduling nightmare. Toss in the fact my body doesn’t operate well in the mornings, and that I could randomly have a few bad days without warning, and you get someone who really doesn’t have the ability to work right now.

I am not defined by my illness, however, I am limited by it. For a long time I lied to myself, and swore that Behcet’s and the things it has caused like gastroparesis and autonomic neuropathy, would never limit me. I was determined to live the life I wanted, despite the symptoms. As I pushed myself, I got sicker and sicker. Then denial kicked in. I told myself that I was in a flare, and that once the flare was over, I could get back to living a normal life. Denial isn’t helpful. I hit a point where I had to acknowledge that some of the things I wanted to do, I couldn’t do, because of my chronic illnesses, and that’s okay.

Yes, you read that right folks, it’s okay to accept that your disease limits you…as long as you don’t let it define the entirety of your being.

I am chronically ill. I may have to use my wheelchair at times. I cannot work. My diet is an absolute wreck, and even when I do follow the doctor’s advice, I can’t always succeed. The ER team knows me. Professors have to allow me extra time should I require it. These are all facts of life for me. I accept it, and I pivot because of it.

Find something else that you love, and know that limitations are not forever, but even the ones that do stick around don’t change who you are as a person. 

Life is what it is, and sometimes we can’t wrap our heads around having to change our plans, but we also can find ourselves trying something new that we hadn’t even thought of before. We find new passions, new paths, and we go with it.

So go with it. 

First Round of IV Vitamins, and the Unemployment/Disability Situation

Operation Relocation?

**Disclaimer: I made a gastroparesis blunder today and overestimated the capacity of my system. Therefore, due to extreme nausea, this blog is being written under the influence of medicinal marijuana. I doubt I’ll edit it before posting. Hopefully my point is made.**

One of the harder parts about being chronically ill, is the financial strain. Even with good insurance, the medical bills pile up. Maybe your main plan has a low catastrophic cap, but what about vision and dental? In my case there is also the reality that I’m the only one that is capable of bringing money into the home. Yes, I get alimony, but along with the finalization of my divorce, comes the reality that I’ll have to pay to keep insurance, and that excludes vision and dental.

Inhale.

The reality of my current state is this…working isn’t possible. Lately walking the dog around the block has been a victory. That victory is short lived because walking the dog wasn’t the only task for the day, and now I’m exhausted. I’ve been waiting on disability, but could still have to wait over a year for my court date. What is a person supposed to do when they’re disabled, but can’t get disability?

I have a credit card that was maxed out between my knee surgery, and chemo. I’ve reached the very end of the road when it comes to pretending you’ve got everything under control.

People can tell I’m faking.

Relocation has become a hot topic, because where I currently live (San Diego) has a high cost of living. I, personally, don’t feel like I have a ton of other options. I have a large service dog, a small retired service dog, and no income aside from alimony. There is nothing in San Diego I can afford, and not many roommates are willing to tolerate the dogs. Family has implored me to move back east, but for a variety of reasons, including all that snow, I’m not sure that would be a responsible choice.

Recently I was offered the chance to live in my aunt’s condo, rent free, in Florida, from May through November. My first thought surrounded the word “free,” but the following thoughts were full of pros and cons. I have made a list, on my whiteboard, and they are exactly even as of right now. Medically there is the fact I’d have to find all new doctors, comfortable with Behcet’s, and then find new ones again because I’d only be there for six months…

Okay, enough about me.

I’m not the only person who faces financial stress because they’re chronically ill. How many homeless people have you met with severe mental or physical disabilities? They didn’t just decide to live outside one day. Society needs to do a better job of helping those who cannot reliably work. I could get a job tomorrow, but I would lose it by next week. I don’t know what days I can eat and what days I can’t. I don’t know when I’ll have severe pain, or nausea, and be unable to make it into work. This is something most of us “sick” folks deal with.

My friend was lucky, she worked for a grocery chain that let her work when she was well, and accepted her absences when she was gone. She didn’t make much, but it made her feel good to be working. When you’re not working, it can become depressing, You want to be contributing. So why don’t we have something for the chronically ill that allows them to work when they’re able, and receive disability benefits regardless?

The assumption is that tons of people abuse the system, and file for disability or other benefits because they’re lazy. Maybe some do…but the process of being approved for disability is beyond broken. I have friends who have been in the system for 3-4 years, while they have bones literally fusing their spines and ribcages. This friend would still work on good days, because she likes feeling fulfilled. That doesn’t mean she isn’t disabled.

Think about it like this: you have a system designed to provide financial assistance to people who are unable to work do to a disability. The reality is that some of those people would work when they felt physically able, but the amount of work they would be able to do would never be enough to provide for them financially. So, instead of working, they wait for their disability benefits. The limited funds must be carefully regulated, so they wait a long time. What if the government realized that those of us who cannot work enough to financially provide for ourselves or our families, could still work in some capacity? Couldn’t we have the chance to work within the disability system itself?

I am great at office work. I am amazing when it comes to organization and filing. You need a friendly face to greet guest at reception? That person would be me. It just may only be me for 2-4 hours at a time. It also may only be me a day or so per week, with gaps in between. I want to contribute, I want to be part of something bigger and better than sitting at home, or at the doctors office. I think most of us who are chronically ill, want to still have a purpose that we pursue.

Some have been lucky to have family and friends to stay with during their financially challenging times, and I’m not saying this as a slight to my friends or family, it’s just something worth noting. There are people who, for whatever reason, rely on themselves during the challenging times, and it’s definitely an anxious thing.

Social programs need to step it up, because they could be so much more, and they could help so many more people. In the meantime I’ll just be figuring out whether it’s time to relocate. It isn’t an easy decision, sick or not, and it’s something that is really weighing on my mind.

Operation Relocation?