When Chronic Illness Pauses Your Life

I found out yesterday that we lost a family member to suicide. My instinct was to get on a plane, fly back home, and be there for his wife and children. Then I had to take a moment to realize that it wouldn’t be possible for me to do that. Financially I can’t afford the airfare, because I haven’t been working…because I’ve been sick. On Thursday I received the Hepatitis A vaccine, and unfortunately I landed in the group of people who react badly to the vaccine. I’ve had a fever, extreme fatigue, and a host of other symptoms. On top of that I’m going through a very annoying steroid taper while increasing my Cell Cept. Then, of course, there is the simple fact that it isn’t safe for me to fly at this stage in my relapse.

When your health puts your life on pause, you learn to just accept it. Sure, you have moments where you’re frustrated, but in the scheme of things you just sort of have to deal with it. In this instance, I can’t make sense of how to make sense of it. There are members of my family that want to see me, and even need me, and I know there is no logical way for me to get to them. I live where I live because there are more medical facilities, and the weather is better for my health…but in these moments I definitely struggle.

It also put a lot of things into perspective regarding my own mental health. I’ve been embarrassed about my struggle with depression…but I still talk with friends about it because I know that I need to bounce it off of certain people. They’ve been instrumental in my seeking increases in depression medication, and pushing for anxiety medication. Still, it isn’t something in my family that is really openly discussed. I know family members who take medication, including myself, but it’s not something that we really are open with. I have friends who take medication as well, but there is still this stigma around it. There is also the idea that you take meds, and you’re better. That is completely not the case for a lot of us. I need to take seizure drugs, my seizure drugs aggravate my already existing depression and anxiety. In fact, they drove my manageable depression into severe depressive disorder.

The person who passed in my family, I didn’t even know he struggled with depression. His wife knew, but again, it wasn’t really openly discussed. For him to go off and end his life was not expected, certainly not the way nor the time that it ended up happening. His daughters are definitely shell shocked, as are the rest of us. Mostly we’re worried for them. To lose a parent to suicide is something I can’t even fathom. Losing a parent is hard enough, but knowing that your father simply couldn’t go on with life, is heartbreaking. I just keep hoping that they know there isn’t anything they could have done to keep him here, and that his ending his own life doesn’t mean he didn’t love them enough to stay. His pain was simply so overwhelming, that he couldn’t see the people who loved him through that painful darkness that enveloped him.

This post isn’t about me taking his death and making it about my health problems. I just think it’s an important topic because of course I would love to just hop a plane and be there with my family. We see how chronic illness impacts things like work and school, but how often do we confront how it impacts our family life? I’ve talked about how I don’t feel like I’ll ever be truly loved in a relationship because of my health issues, and that is still something I struggle with. Coming to grips with my limitations within my own family is even harder. It’s one thing when I am let down by my health, it’s another when I let down others. If I had my wheelchair, I would chance flying, despite the doctor’s warnings…but I don’t. With the other medical issues I’ve been juggling, I know it isn’t realistic to try and go…but it doesn’t make it easier.

Hug the ones you love. Open your arms to those with physical and mental struggles. Talk about mental health issues because they’re not something to be ashamed of.

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When Chronic Illness Pauses Your Life

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